Wednesday, June 22, 2022

What Type Of Questions To Ask During An Interview

Don't Miss

Questions About Next Steps

Top 5 Interview Questions To Ask In A Job Interview

10. Whats your timeline for next steps?

This is a basic logistics question, but its useful to ask because it gives you a benchmark for when you can expect to hear something back. Otherwise, in a few days youre likely to start agonizing about whether you should have heard back about the job by now and what it means that you havent, and obsessively checking your phone to see if the employer has tried to make contact. Its much better for your quality of life if you know that youre not likely to hear anything for two weeks or four weeks or that the hiring manager is leaving the country for a month and nothing will happen until shes back, or whatever the case might be.

Plus, asking this question makes it easy for you to check in with the employer if the timeline they give you comes and goes with no word. If they tell you that they plan to make a decision in two weeks and its been three weeks, you can reasonably email them and say something like, I know you were hoping to make a decision around this time, so I wanted to check in and see if you have an updated timeline you can share. Im really interested in the position and would love to talk more with you.

Get Ask a Boss delivered every week

Order Alison Greens book Ask a Manager: Clueless Colleagues, Lunch-Stealing Bosses, and the Rest of Your Life at Work here. Got a question for her? Email . Her advice column appears here every Tuesday.

Are You Applying For Other Jobs Do You Have Any Other Offer In Hand

Do not get intimidated with this HR interview question and answer. You can be open about the other offer or keep it private, depending on how happy you are with it.

HR recruiters generally ask this to understand your demand in the market. They also want to know that by the time they interview you and reach the offer stage, you would have already accepted another one.

Bonus: Questions You Should Never Ask During An Interview

  • Information that can be found through a simple Google search. Interview questions such as, âWhat does your company do?â or âWho is your competition?â make you look like you did not do your research and are not serious about your candidacy.
  • Gossip. If you have heard something through the grapevine that makes you doubt the company’s financial strength, ask your question in a non-confrontational way. Instead of, âWhy are you about to lay off 1,000 employees next month?â, ask the hiring manager for his or her opinion about how well positioned the company is for the future.
  • Pay, raises, and promotions. All of that will be discussed as part of the offer process. It’s best to avoid questions that make you look too cocky, or paint the picture of someone who makes the decision based primarily on money.
  • Background checks. Assume that the company will run a background check as part of the pre-offer due diligence. Asking this question makes you look like you have something to hide.
  • Email or social media monitoring. Assume that the company monitors network usage in some way. The internet has a long memory and written comments have a way of getting around. Play it safe and don’t use the company’s network in ways that can make you look unprofessional.
  • Deeply personal or invasive questions. You don’t want to make the interviewer feel uncomfortable or defensive.

Need help preparing for your next interview? Talk to a qualified TopInterview coach today!

You May Like: What Will They Ask You In A Job Interview

Questions About The Company

7. How would you describe the culture here? What type of people tend to really thrive here, and what type dont do as well?

Sometimes hiring managers are pretty bad at accurately describing the culture on their teams in part because they have a vested interest in seeing it a certain way and in part because they have an inherently different vantage point than their staff members do. For example, Ive heard incorrigible micromanagers tell candidates that they like to give people a lot of independence and autonomy and they probably really believed that about themselves. So take managers descriptions of culture with a heavy grain of salt , but theres still value in hearing what they do and dont emphasize.

But asking about what types of people tend to thrive versus those who tend to struggle can get you more revealing information. Youll often learn what that manager really cares about in their employees, or which traits will set you up to clash with them, or whos likely to bristle at their management style.

8. What do you like about working here?

You can learn a lot by the way interviewers respond to this question. People who genuinely enjoy their jobs and the company will usually have several things they can tell you that they like about working there and will usually sound sincere. But if you get a blank stare or a long silence before your interviewer answers, or the answer is something like the paycheck, consider that a red flag.

Work Experience Questions To Ask Job Candidates:

Job Interview
  • What types of jobs have you held in the past?
  • What was your title at your current/previous/last job?
  • What were your duties in that position?
  • What did you like most/least about the position?
  • Why are you leaving your present employer?
  • Whats the most important thing you learned in school and/or at your last job?
  • Why did you choose your major?
  • If selected for this position, can you describe your strategy for the first 90 days?
  • What is your understanding of the skills necessary to perform this job?
  • What special training have you completed that qualifies you for this job?
  • What certifications do you hold?
  • Can you describe how to _____________ ?
  • This job requires the ability to _____________ . Can you give me an example of a time that you have had to _____________ ?

Don’t Miss: How To Answer Hr Interview Questions

Tell Me A Little About Yourself

If you’re the interviewer, there’s a lot you should already know: The candidate’s resume and cover letter should tell you plenty, and LinkedIn and Twitter and Facebook and Google can tell you more.

The goal of an interview is to determine whether the candidate will be outstanding in the job, and that means evaluating the skills and attitude required for that job. Does she need to be an empathetic leader? Ask about that. Does she need to take your company public? Ask about that.

If you’re the candidate, talk about why you took certain jobs. Explain why you left. Explain why you chose a certain school. Share why you decided to go to grad school. Discuss why you took a year off to backpack through Europe, and what you got out of the experience.

When you answer this question, connect the dots on your resume so the interviewer understands not just what you’ve done, but also why.

Communication Skills Interview Questions

Good communication skills are essential for workplace success. When you interview for a job, the hiring manager will ask about communication skills, including how you handle issues, how you handle difficult situations, what you expect as far as communications from management, and other questions related to your ability to communicate.

You May Like: What Questions To Ask A Project Manager Interview

What Was Your Salary In Your Last Job

This is a tough one. You want to be open and honest, but frankly, some companies ask the question as the opening move in salary negotiations.

Try an approach recommended by Liz Ryan. When asked, say, “I’m focusing on jobs in the $50K range. Is this position in that range?”

Maybe the interviewer will answer maybe she won’t. If she presses you for an answer, you’ll have to decide whether you want to share or demur. Ultimately your answer won’t matter too much, because you’ll either accept the salary offered or you won’t, depending on what you think is fair.

How Is The Feedback Process Structured

5 Good Questions To Ask An Employer During A Job Interview

Asking this question in an interview has been critical for me as a candidate. Performance feedback is how humans get better. Excellence and mastery have always been important to me, and I am aware that they are impossible without knowing how and when to ask for regular feedback. Does this company limit its feedback cycle to the annual reviews? Does the hiring manager make it a priority to deliver just-in-time acknowledgment and suggestions for improvement?

You May Like: How Do You Answer Interview Questions

Top Questions To Ask An Interviewee

When conducting interviews to fill critical job vacancies its important to ask the right questions of the interviewee and reveal the best answers ensuring a more informed hiring decision.

These 25 interview questions for interviewees will help the interviewer get to know a candidate better before making a decision to bring them aboard their company.

Here Are The Most Commonly Asked Interview Questions You Can Expect To Be Asked In Your Interview And Advice On How You Can Craft Effective Responses

Know these popular interview questions and answers.

Too many job seekers stumble through interviews as if the questions asked are coming out of left field. But many interview questions are to be expected. Need some job interview tips? Monster has you covered. Study this list of popular and frequently asked interview questions and answers ahead of time so you’ll be ready to answer them with confidence.

Also Check: What Is A One Way Interview

Work Habits And Working Style Questions To Ask Job Candidates:

  • How would you describe your work style?
  • What techniques and tools do you use to keep yourself organized?
  • If you had to choose one, would you consider yourself a big-picture person or a detail-oriented person?
  • What are your strengths as an employee?
  • What are your weaknesses as an employee?
  • When were you most satisfied in your job?
  • What can you do for us that other candidates cant?
  • What were the responsibilities of your last position?
  • Give me an example of a time that you felt you went above and beyond the call of duty at work.
  • What was the last project you led, and what was its outcome?
  • Can you describe a time when your work was criticized?
  • How do you handle working with people who annoy you?
  • Have you ever been on a team where someone was not pulling their own weight? How did you handle it?
  • Tell me about a time when you had to give someone difficult feedback. How did you handle it?
  • If I were your supervisor and asked you to do something that you disagreed with, what would you do?
  • Describe how you would handle a situation if you were required to finish multiple tasks by the end of the day, and there was no possible way that you could finish them.
  • What did you dislike about your least favorite former supervisor and/or coworker?
  • How would your previous co-workers describe you?
  • Can you give me an example of a time you worked through a conflict with a coworker?

Tell Me About Yourself

Best Job Interview Question to Ask In Your Interview

If everything else seems too much, lead with this timeless question. You simply cannot go wrong here.

Sometimes, the best answers come from open-ended queries. This is your best chance to know the candidates history, career accomplishments, and get a feel for their career goals all at the same time.

It is less intrusive and leading with this question makes it easier to approach other questionsdepending on how sensitive the position is.

Don’t Miss: How To Prepare Google Interview

Interview Questions About The Job Position:

  • What prompted you to hire for this job role?
  • How long has the position been open?
  • What was the individual like who previously held this position?
  • Are you looking to hire someone with the skills and experiences to do the job out of the gate, or are you open to hiring and training the right candidate for this position?
  • How are goals and objectives set for this job role?
  • If hired, what would be the top three priorities you’d like me to focus on in the coming year?
  • What traits does the perfect candidate for this job position possess?
  • What can you tell me about the position that isn’t listed in the job post?
  • What do you believe is the main reason someone could fail in this position?
  • I’ve worked with larger corporations in the past . That being the case, do you think I’ll be successful with an organization such as yours?
  • What is the work schedule like? Is it flexible, set-in-stone, or are there options?
  • Do you have any reservations about my qualifications?
  • What is a typical day, week, or month like for someone within this position?
  • What is the toughest time of the month or year for someone in this position?
  • How can I grow in this job role?
  • In an ideal world, what’s the anticipated start date for this position?
  • What’s the timeline for making a decision on this job position? When would be a good time for me to follow-up with you?

When Were You Most Satisfied In Your Job

The interviewer who asks, “When were you most satisfied in your job?” wants to know what motivates you. If you can relate an example of a job or project when you were excited, the interviewer will get an idea of your preferences. “I was very satisfied in my last job, because I worked directly with the customers and their problems that is an important part of the job for me.”

Also Check: How To Conduct A Behavioral Interview

Question #: Is There Anything About My Background Or Resume That Makes You Question Whether I Am A Good Fit For This Role

This question displays that youre highly invested in the job and committed to understanding your prospects as a candidate. Plus, it will also allow you an opportunity to respond to any potential concerns. Lastly, this question is best to ask at the end of the interview to gauge where you might stand within the job process.

Career Goal Questions To Ask Job Candidates:

The Most Valuable Question to Ask in a Job Interview
  • Why do you want this job?
  • Where would you like to be in your career five years from now?
  • Why should we hire you?
  • Why are you leaving your present job?
  • What salary are you seeking?
  • Whats your salary history?
  • If I were to give you the salary you requested, but let you write your job description for the next year, what would it say?
  • What are you looking for in terms of career development?
  • How do you want to improve yourself in the next year?
  • What kind of goals would you have in mind if you got this job?

Which questions do you think are most helpful when it comes to hiring new employees? Have you had better luck focusing on personality or work experience? Id love to hear your thoughts in the comments, or on Twitter

Read Also: How To Pass A Job Interview

Where Do You See Yourself In Five Years

A job candidate who has professional drive and lofty career aspirations is valuable. Look for someone who is engaged in their career and has clear goals, and consider mentioning how your organization can help them achieve those objectives. Finding a prospect who is interested in career advancement and sees opportunity with your company increases the chances that theyll be happy in the long run.

What Do You Plan To Do If

Every business faces a major challenge: technological changes, competitors entering the market, shifting economic trends. There’s rarely one of Warren Buffett’s moats protecting a small business.

So while some candidates may see your company as a stepping-stone, they still hope for growth and advancement. If they do eventually leave, they want it to be on their terms, not because you were forced out of business.

Say I’m interviewing for a position at your ski shop. Another store is opening less than a mile away: How do you plan to deal with the competition? Or you run a poultry farm : What will you do to deal with rising feed costs?

Great candidates don’t just want to know what you think they want to know what you plan to do — and how they will fit into those plans.

Get Inc.âs top posts straight to your inbox. and youâll receive Todayâs Must Reads before each day is done.

You May Like: How To Write A Good Interview Thank You Note

Questions About The Department Where The Open Position Is Located

This is a critical line of questioning because you’re getting to know the specifics of your coworkers. You’ll also see the types of processes that your coworkers abide by to generate success.

  • Who is the person that I’m directly reporting to?
  • Can you explain more about the department that I’ll be working with?
  • Is there another coworker that I’ll work closely with other than my manager?
  • What do you believe are my manager’s greatest strengths and weaknesses?
  • Is there going to be more hires in this department over the next year?
  • Is there another department that I’ll be coordinating with daily?
  • Is there a common trajectory for people who’ve previously worked in this department?
  • What opportunities do you see from working with this team?
  • Are you aware of team-building activities that this department participates in?
  • How much of an impact do you believe this department has in regards to the success of the company?

Interviews Aren’t Just About Giving The Right Answersthey’re About Asking The Right Questions

5 Must

Ask insightful, thorough questions to your potential employer.

The landscape for job seekers today can be difficult. In other words, if you want a job today, the hard work starts when you prepare for the interview. That means not just nailing the interview questions you are asked, but actually knowing which questions to ask in an interview so that you leave a strong impression on hiring managers. After all, youre reviewing them as much as theyre reviewing you. The right questions to ask during an interview are the ones that will not only elicit important information, but will also reflect positively on you as a candidate.

Heres the thing: Rattling off a list of haphazard queries wont get you much attention. You need to come up with good questions to ask in an interview, ones that make the people in the room sit up and take notice. Your questions must demonstrate that you did your homework on the job itself, have a set of values that are shared with the company, and understand where the industry is headed. Bonus: These questions could also help you avoid a bad boss before it’s too late.

Your goal is to make a statement in the form of a question. The statement is designed to:

  • Highlight your qualifications.
  • Understand the employers challenges.
  • Make yourself accountable.
  • Advance your candidacy.

You May Like: How To Do An Interview

More articles

Popular Articles